Late Fall RV Camping in Ontario

Late Fall RV Camping in Ontario

RV travelers love fall at Ontario Parks even after Canadian Thanksgiving (the second Monday in October). Some even camp in winter. Park staff affectionately call these campers ‘winter warriors’ since staying warm and maintaining the water systems in your RV in Ontario’s winter temperatures is a challenge.  These four Ontario Parks are your best bet for late fall camping in an RV. Know that trailer fill stations for water are normally closed later in the season, based on weather.  However, three parks have campgrounds offering electrical service and comfort stations with hot showers that are open year-round. The fourth, Killarney Provincial Park, does not have electrical service.  The park also closes its comfort stations and turns off its water systems following the Canadian Thanksgiving, but the bathrooms outside of the main office remain open along with a tap so campers can access water to fill large jugs. Don’t forget that you need a park permit to camp in any season at Ontario Parks. More detailed RV information is on the Ontario Parks web site.

Mew Lake Campground is in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario’s oldest provincial park and its most famous. It’s about 3.5 hours north of Toronto at km 30.8 on Highway 60 which runs east-west through the southern portion of Algonquin.  You can get cell phone reception at the Algonquin Visitor Centre which is open on weekends. Algonquin’s legendary fall colors generally peak in late September. Late fall colors known as the ‘golden encore’ are worth experiencing too, especially on the park’s many hiking trails. Ian Shanahan, a former Algonquin Natural Heritage Education Specialist, describes the ‘golden encore’ in this Park Blog post. In winter, Algonquin’s cross-country ski trails are fantastic. They’re groomed, well-signed and include heated warming huts. Pine Tree Loop, one of Algonquin’s Leaf Trails is regarded by many as the finest cross-country ski trail in ‘southern’ Ontario. For Algonquin’s news, follow @Algonquin_PP

MacGregor Point Provincial Park and its year-round Birch Boulevard Campground are on Lake Huron near Port Elgin, about 4 hours northwest of Toronto. Campsites are available on a first-come, first-served or reservation basis, depending on the time of year. Birdwatchers ‘flock’ to this park especially during spring and fall migrations. Visit in spring for the park’s annual spring Huron Fringe Birding Festival which celebrates the return of songbirds. And in the fall, Wild for the Arts art festival is another popular park event. Electrical sites in Birch Boulevard are large, level, and well-treed. Staff suggest you pack an extra-long electrical cord to ensure you can reach your site’s electrical outlet. Park hiking trails range from easy to moderate. Mountain biking is also permitted on some trails so pack your bike. In winter, the park’s heated yurts are popular for overnight stays. Eleven kilometers of trails are groomed for cross country skiing, and you can ski or snowshoe many more kilometers of unplowed park roads. If you love to skate (weather-permitting).  MacGregor Point’s cool skate path through the woods is worth the drive. For the latest park news, follow @MacGregorPoint on Twitter.

Cedars_Trail_Pinery_Provincial_Pk

Sunsets at Pinery Provincial Park on Lake Huron are rated by National Geographic as “among the top 10 best in the world’. This popular beach park is booked solid in summer but in late fall it is far less busy and offers some good year-round recreation in its rare Carolinian forests and rolling dunes. There are 10 kilometers of walking trails, a 14-kilometer bike trail and 38 kilometers of groomed ski trails (weather-permitting). Thousands of Tundra Swans pass by the park in spring. In winter, Red-tailed Hawks and Tufted Titmice hang out at the park’s Visitor Centre feeders. The park’s Riverside Campground Area 1 stays open all year and has electrical outlets and a winterized comfort station with flush toilets and showers. Heated yurts and a winterized cabin are also available for rent in the campground. Get Pinery’s latest news on Twitter @PineryProvPark

Chikanishing_Trail_Killarney

A wild Lake Huron- Georgian Bay coastline, the LA Cloche quartzite mountain range and 50 sapphire-colored lakes are what you can expect to see at Killarney Provincial Park. Fall hiking trails range from two to sixty kilometers in length and their degree of difficulty runs from moderate to strenuous. You can also bike Killarney’s roads or the bike trail which runs along the Chikanishing Creek to the Chikanishing Access Point. George Lake Campground is open year-round but as mentioned earlier in this post, it does not have electrical sites and turns off its water and closes its comfort stations following the Canadian Thanksgiving holiday (second Monday in October). Park staff do leave the main office outside bathrooms open and have installed a tap specific to fill large water jugs. In winter, George Lake campground is walk-in only. Cross-country skiers and snowshoers rent the campground’s heated yurts.  Park staff provide toboggans so campers can haul their gear to a heated yurt. Staff say winter campers love the walk-in since it gives them a sense of “remoteness”. The trail is between 500 and 700 meters long.

Featured Image Credit: ZIPNON / Pixabay
In Post Image 1: Tony Webster / flickr
In Post Image 2: Wikimedia Commons
In Post Image 3: Wikimedia Commons
In Post Image 4: Wikimedia Commons

The Best Places for Boondocking in the United States

The Best Places for Boondocking in the United States

The notion of primitive camping in wild places is not for everyone, but for adventurous, intrepid travelers that don’t mind the mystery and gentle grit of off-the-grid living, the United States offers boundless opportunities for campers and RVers to experience some of the country’s most impressive natural areas- all without dipping into your wallet. From BLM public land (Bureau of Land Management) and National Forest service roads to wildlife areas and state parks and everything in between, here’s our roundup of some of the best places for boondocking in the United States.

Anza Borrego Desert State Park
Image Credit: Carrie Kaufmann/ flickr

Anza Borrego Desert State Park, California

California is one of the most traveled-to and populous states in the country, so it’s no surprise that free dispersed campsites can be a bit harder to find. Boondockers traveling to Southern California can find solace in Anza Borrego State Park, though: the state’s largest state park, and the only one that allows permit-free and fee-free primitive camping. With hundreds of miles of slot canyon hiking trails and remote dirt roads that truly make you feel like you’re off the beaten track- and sometimes, on another planet! – it’s quite the dose of solitude, yet you’re still under two hours from the bustling San Diego coast. Our insider tip: try and go during Spring to catch the park’s rainbow carpet of wildflowers!

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas within the park. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Anza Borrego Desert State Park:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a California State Parks annual pass or a single-day pass, as these are required for entry to the park.
  2. Once you arrive at the park, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Upper Coyote Canyon Primitive Camping Area or the Yaqui Meadows Boondocking Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with beautiful views of the desert landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the park’s many hiking trails and attractions. Some popular hikes include the Palm Canyon Trail, the Borrego Palm Canyon Nature Trail, and the Cactus Loop Trail.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park Visitor Center, where you can learn more about the park’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful desert sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.


Image Credit: My Public Lands Magazine via Wikimedia Commons

Quartzite, Arizona

Quartzite, a small Arizona desert town halfway between Phoenix and Palm Springs, has a bit of a legend’s lore attached to it. While there certainly may be more scenic places to boondock in Arizona, part of Quartzite’s allure is the community it attracts, especially during the winter months, when the town’s population swells tenfold, and it hosts several mineral and gem shows, quirky swap meets, and a handful of notable rendezvous geared toward those living on the road. It’s nearly all primitive camping, and you can park as close or as far away from others as you wish, but the most memorable part of your stay will probably be the conversations and connections with like-minded travelers and characterful rubber tramps, so don’t stray too far from the action

Quartzite, Arizona is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas in and around the town. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Quartzite:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas in and around Quartzite.
  2. Once you arrive in Quartzite, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Plomosa Road Boondocking Area or the La Posa Long Term Visitor Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with stunning views of the desert landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the area’s many hiking trails, off-road trails, and other outdoor attractions. Some popular hikes include the Lost Dutchman State Park, the Buckskin Mountain State Park, and the Joshua Tree Forest.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Quartzsite Pow Wow, a popular annual event that features Native American dance competitions, crafts, and food.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful desert sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Quartzite is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant outdoor activities, and a rich cultural heritage.

Lake Whitney Rainbow
Image Credit: RamiLudo, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Lake Whitney, Texas

Located right in the heart of Texas and less than 90 minutes from the cities of Dallas and Waco, beautiful Lake Whitney is a boondocker’s hidden treasure. Maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers, the entire lake- which is a controlled reservoir on a section of the Brazos River- offers several different areas of free primitive campsites, most of which come with a fire ring, a shaded picnic table, and a spectacular view of the water. The public access is superb, with endless opportunities for swimming, fishing, and boating, and the abundance of trees around the sites makes you feel like you have your own slice of lakefront paradise. It’s a fantastic retreat for campers looking to beat the Texas heat.

Lake Whitney is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas around the lake. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking at Lake Whitney:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a Texas State Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas around Lake Whitney.
  2. Once you arrive at Lake Whitney, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Lone Star Primitive Camping Area or the Hilltop Camping Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with stunning views of the lake and surrounding landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the lake and its many recreational activities, such as swimming, boating, fishing, and water sports.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Lake Whitney State Park, where you can learn more about the lake’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful lake sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Lake Whitney is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant water activities, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.

San Juan National Forest
Image Credit: Stefan Serena / flickr

San Juan National Forest, Colorado

Colorado makes a strong case as one of the very top states for truly epic boondocking experiences, and for good reason: the dispersed camping is often very dispersed, and the storybook views you’ll find from many sites are hard to beat. Some of our favorite areas lay within the rugged, awe-inspiringly beautiful San Juan National Forest, close to the towns of Durango, Silverton, Ouray, and Telluride. The forest service roads you’ll have at your disposal are seemingly endless, and you can take your pick based on what your vehicle can handle.

While trickier during the snowy winter months, summer and the shoulder seasons offer crisp high elevation air, and more outdoor activities to keep you busy than you’ll know what to do with.

San Juan National Forest is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas within the forest. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in San Juan National Forest:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas within San Juan National Forest.
  2. Once you arrive at the forest, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Lemon Reservoir Primitive Camping Area or the East Canyon Primitive Camping Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with beautiful views of the forest and surrounding landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the forest’s many hiking trails and attractions. Some popular hikes include the San Juan Skyway Scenic Byway, the Chicago Basin, and the Weminuche Wilderness.
  4. Be sure to also visit the San Juan National Forest Visitor Center, where you can learn more about the forest’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful forest sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, San Juan National Forest is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.

MOAB
Image Credit: Antrell Williams / flickr

Moab, Utah

Moab leaves quite an impression with its stately red rock formations and towering desert buttes, and the boondocking options are bound to do the same. From the La Sal Loop Road in Manti La-Sal National Forest- oh, the views! – to Klondike Bluffs Road on BLM land just outside of town, places with dispersed camping are far and wide, and often offer a gateway to adventure right outside your doorstep, which is probably why you’re in Moab to begin with! Although a bit further from the city, there are plenty of accessible public land pull-offs right outside of Canyonlands National Park, too, if you’re looking for a quick gateway into the park.

Moab, Utah is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas in and around the town. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Moab:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas in and around Moab.
  2. Once you arrive in Moab, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Kane Creek Road Boondocking Area or the Hidden Valley Boondocking Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with stunning views of the desert landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the area’s many hiking trails, off-road trails, and other outdoor attractions. Some popular hikes include the Arches National Park, the Canyonlands National Park, and the Dead Horse Point State Park.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Moab Information Center, where you can learn more about the area’s history and attractions, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful desert sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Moab is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant outdoor activities, and a rich cultural heritage.

Coconino National Forest
Image Credit: Kevin Dooley / flickr

Coconino National Forest, Arizona

Coconino National Forest blankets an expansive area in and around the flourishing cities of Sedona and Flagstaff, and you could probably spend years trying to explore all the boondock- able service roads in the area and still not see them all. Depending on how far you’re looking to stray from the main trailheads and attractions- and more importantly, depending on the off-road capabilities of your home on wheels- you’ll find something that suits your style and comfort level. The closer to Grand Canyon National Park you get, the tougher it may be to simply pull up and snag a spot, but if you look hard enough, trust us, you’ll find something.

Coconino National Forest is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas within the forest. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Coconino National Forest:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas within Coconino National Forest.
  2. Once you arrive at the forest, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the West Clear Creek Wilderness Area or the Oak Creek Canyon Primitive Camping Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with beautiful views of the forest and surrounding landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the forest’s many hiking trails and attractions. Some popular hikes include the Kachina Trail, the Mount Elden Lookout Trail, and the Humphreys Peak Trail.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Coconino National Forest Visitor Center, where you can learn more about the forest’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful forest sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Coconino National Forest is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.

Buffalo Gap Grasslands
Image Credit: Bri Weldon / flickr

Buffalo Gap National Grassland, South Dakota

It’s hard to grasp the vastness of Buffalo Gap National Grassland until you’ve spent a few days camping within the area. With sweeping prairie vistas, alienesque rock outcroppings and slingshot views of neighboring Badlands National Park, this sprawling piece of nature in southwest South Dakota is a boondocker’s delight, and camping seclusion at its finest. A couple of the most desirable areas to drop anchor are Badlands Overlook and Nomad View, sections of dusty, bumpy roads teetering alongside cliffs that offer surreal vistas of the Buffalo Gap and the distant Black Hills. It’s a great place to truly unwind and feel the scope of endless skies and grasslands on the horizon.

Buffalo Gap National Grassland is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas within the grassland. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Buffalo Gap National Grassland:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas within Buffalo Gap National Grassland.
  2. Once you arrive at the grassland, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Fort Pierre National Grassland or the Cactus Flat Primitive Camping Area. These areas offer secluded campsites with beautiful views of the grassland and surrounding landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the grassland’s many hiking trails and attractions. Some popular hikes include the Castle Trail, the Red Shirt Table Trail, and the Medicine Root Loop Trail.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Buffalo Gap National Grassland Visitor Center, where you can learn more about the grassland’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful grassland sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Buffalo Gap National Grassland is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.

Caribou-Targhee National Forest
Image Credit: Intermountain Forest Service, USDA Region 4 Photography / flickr

Caribou-Targhee National Forest, Idaho/Wyoming Border

Both Wyoming and Idaho have their own long lists of spectacular boondocking areas- like the Sawtooth in Idaho or the Bridger-Teton Wilderness in Wyoming, for starters- but one of our favorite under-the-radar spots is the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, which extends its sprawling woodlands, winding rivers and granite peaks into both states. The primitive campsites which straddle the Idaho-Wyoming border near Moose Creek are especially inspiring and are bound to offer a solitary wilderness experience- and perhaps even some wildlife sightings! – you won’t soon forget.

Caribou-Targhee National Forest is a popular destination for RV boondocking, with several designated boondocking areas within the forest. Here is a sample itinerary for RV boondocking in Caribou-Targhee National Forest:

  1. Before you arrive, make sure to purchase a National Parks pass, as this is required for entry to many of the boondocking areas within Caribou-Targhee National Forest.
  2. Once you arrive at the forest, head to one of the designated boondocking areas, such as the Greys River Ranger District or the Palisades Ranger District. These areas offer secluded campsites with beautiful views of the forest and surrounding landscape.
  3. Spend your days exploring the forest’s many hiking trails and attractions. Some popular hikes include the Teton Crest Trail, the Table Mountain Trail, and the Jedediah Smith Wilderness.
  4. Be sure to also visit the Caribou-Targhee National Forest Visitor Center, where you can learn more about the forest’s history and wildlife, and pick up maps and other helpful information.
  5. In the evenings, relax at your campsite and enjoy the beautiful forest sunset. Be sure to bring plenty of water and supplies, as there are no services available in the boondocking areas.

Overall, Caribou-Targhee National Forest is a great destination for RV boondocking, offering beautiful scenery, abundant wildlife, and plenty of opportunities for outdoor adventure.

Featured Image Credit: RV Hive/ flickr

The Best RV Parks on the Beach

The Best RV Parks on the Beach

Camping and traveling from place to place is a traditional pastime enjoyed by many. Getting everyone loaded up in the RV and preparing for those weekend excursions are memories that last a lifetime. Regardless if you are with kids, a partner, or riding solo, RV parks are a traveler’s oasis, offering comfort and security when you need it most.

In this article, we’re going to be taking a look at some of the best RV parks in Texas, Florida, and Arizona. Before enduring hundreds (if not, thousands) of miles of driving, we’re going to highlight what sets these parks apart from the rest so you have an idea of where to set your sights next time you’re in the area.

What is an RV Park?

Grand Canyon National Park Trailer Village
Image Credit: Grand Canyon National Park Trailer Village / flickr

RV parks have been around for decades, offering their services to those passing by, or folks aiming to set up and relax for extended periods of time. Recreational Vehicle parks (RV parks), are destination spots designed for travelers to stay for variable places of time while on the road.

Don’t be confused by the name though, RV parks also host guests who wish to camp in tents. The biggest difference between tent parks though is that RV parks offer a range of amenities.

Due to the rise in popularity of full-time RV living, parks have increased in size and expanded their scope of services to ensure guests are welcomed with respect.

What Makes For a Great RV Park?

Before the internet, information was limited, and uncovering details about parks in advance was more challenging than it is today. Luckily, travelers now have the ability to check ahead of time to see if the park they plan on visiting has all the amenities needed. While a majority of RV parks offer generally the same services, it’s best to identify what makes for a great RV park before planning any future trips.

RV Blackwater
Image Credit: Mandruss, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Water

Very rarely will you encounter an RV park that doesn’t include water hookups. Being that tank space is so limited on a variety of RVs, having a water hookup will ensure you can use outlets such as your sink, shower, or hose. Should the park not have hookups for water, be conservative in your water consumption and plan accordingly.

Sewer

Having the ability to properly dispose of your waste is a pleasure not everyone has. While traveling, having this option can alleviate capacity crises and help ease your trip. Not having sewer hookups surely isn’t a make-it-or-break-it deal, but this feature is a great add-on.

AC Power

RVs require a lot of power to be functional and operate. While staying at a certain location for extended periods of time, having a power connection is critical. In addition to enjoying a more luxurious experience, having heat or keeping your refrigerator and freezer cool are a must. Many RV parks nowadays have options for power hookups, so just be sure to prepare in advance and reserve your spot ahead of time.

Wi-Fi

Let’s face it, we live in the tech age, and having Wi-Fi is nearly a normal part of life. While some may not be on board when camping (which is perfectly fine) many enjoy having the luxury of streaming movies, listening to music, or catching up on work emails. Due to the increase in demand over the years, many RV parks have started to offer Wi-Fi hotspots and help guests stay connected.

Reviews of the Best RV Parks on the Beach

Now we’re going to switch gears and focus on the top parks that made the list for each state. With this, we’ll be discussing the amenities that are offered in each park and why guests have loved them.

Best RV Parks in Texas

In the United States, one of the best states for RV parks is the Lone Star state of Texas. In this section, we’re going to outline the top RV parks along the Gulf of Texas.

Loyd Park


Image Credit: Wikimedia

The first park on our list is Loyd Park, located in Grand Prairie, Texas. There are 221 sites available and all are perfect for either an overnight pit stop or week(end) stay. This park is kid-friendly, offering a pool and playground, as well as many basic life amenities.

Although the park does not feature Wi-Fi, Loyd Park has electric hookups (30 AMP, not 50 AMP), and a dump station for sewer. The only downside we found is that there is an extra parking fee of $10 per motor vehicle, which can be burdensome if you travel in large groups. However, there are pull-thru sites for those with larger RVs.

Link to campground website

Dellanera RV Park

Dellanera RV Park
Image Credit: Allen Sheffield / flickr

Located along the Texas gulf in Galveston, Texas is Dellanera RV Park. Totalling 65 sites available to those who pass by, this park also offers full hookups (30 AMP and 50 AMP), water, sewer, showers, and laundry amenities. This park is ideal for those who like to work on the road is that it offers WiFi and internet connectivity. For those who travel as a family, Dellanera RV park also offers a playground and is overall very kid friendly. The only drawback we found to this RV park is that the sites are very tight and may be challenging if traveling in a large class A motorhome or bus.

Link to campground website

Galveston Island RV Resort


Image Clip Credit: Free To Roam RV / Youtube 

Galveston Island RV Resort is next on our list in Texas. Located along the gulf, this park features 116 sites, Wi-Fi, full hookups, and basic needs such as water, sewer, shower, and laundry services. One of the great features of this RV resort is there are extra recreation activities to enjoy, such as horseshoes, a playground, fishing, and even a pool.

On-site, there’s also a general store for those little last-minute items you may need, as well as propane. The only drawback we discovered while reviewing this park is that basic WiFi may be slow at times, but you can upgrade to high speed for an additional weekly fee.

Link to campground website

South Padre Island KOA

South Padre Island KOA
Image Credit: Larry Pearson / flickr

Located in one of the most southern parts of Texas, South Padre Island KOA is a kid-friendly park, perfect for summer excursions or winter getaways. They feature a year-round pool, a dog park, Wi-Fi, and full hookups for basic amenities. Pull-thru sites are available for those who travel with larger RVs and may require extra space.

This KOA seems to have everything. Guests can enjoy horseshoes, workout facilities, play at the playground, or watch basic cable when it’s time to wind down and relax. After reading through reviews, a common drawback noted by recent visitors is that the park is a little dirty in areas. Don’t let this be a deterrent though, this is a top of the line KOA.

Link to campground website

Best RV Parks in Florida

Now that we’ve highlighted the best RV parks on the beach in Texas, we’re going to shine a light on a handful of parks in Florida. The RV parks we’ve selected all offer unique perks to those who stop by and are well-known by travelers. Let’s take a look at why they made our list and what you can expect while visiting.

Bahia Honda State Park

Bahia Honda State Park
Image Credit: Matt Kieffer / flickr

Bahia Honda State Park may be considered one of the best beaches in Southern Florida and offers a diverse array of activities for entertainment. Located along the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, this park is perfect for fishing, swimming, snorkeling, and relaxing. Those who camp at Bahia can expect their site to include water hookups, electricity, a picnic table, and a grill. With this, the maximum RV length is 50 feet. Be sure to book in advance as this is one of the most visited parks in Florida.

Link to Bahia Honda Park website

Anastasia State Park

Anastasia State Park
Image Credit: Thomas Gaume / flickr

Another popular park in Florida is Anastasia State Park, located in St. Augustine. With a total of 139 sites, visitors can take their pick from an assortment of activities. From hiking to kayaking, to even bird watching, masses are drawn to partake in the activities offered.

One of the greatest benefits is that those in need of sewer hookups can utilize the communal dump station, free to those in need. All sites feature an in-ground grill with a fire pit ring, water, and electricity. However, keep in mind that the maximum RV length is 40 feet at Anastasia State Park.

Link to Florida State Parks – Anastasia Park page

Henderson Beach State Park

Henderson Beach State Park
Image Credit: Ebyabe, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

With over 6000 feet of beautiful shoreline, Henderson Beach State Park is the third park on our list of the best RV parks on the beach in Florida. There are 60 sites available, both pull-through and back-in, and all but two feature 30 and 50-amp hookups, water, picnic tables, and grills.

While there are no sewer hookups at sites, Henderson Beach does offer a central dump station for visitors. This park is pet-friendly and general amenities include washer and dryers (coin-operated), and showers are offered in the bathrooms. Sites are designed to fit RVs up to 60 feet.

Link to Florida State Parks – Henderson Park page

Red Coconut RV Park

Red Coconut RV Park
Image Credit: Red Coconut RV Park, LLP

Red Coconut RV Park also made our list as another gorgeous place to rest up after the sun goes down. Offering 450 feet of shoreline, visitors can pull up and enjoy views while sunbathing, swimming, or playing a round of golf at one of the nearby courses.

Sites come with full hookups, LP gas, and basic cable and internet. Although streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu will not function at Red Coconut due to a reduction in nearby user access, guests can still check up on emails and stay connected. Red Coconut also features a clubhouse where they host communal holiday dinners, weekly pot luck dinners, and pancake breakfasts.

Link to Park website

Grassy Key RV Park & Resort

Grassy Key RV Park & Resort
Image Credit: Grassy Key RV Park & Resort

The final park we want to highlight in Florida is the Grassy Key RV Park and Resort in the city of Marathon. Not only does this park offer beach access to visitors, but guests can also take a relaxing dip in the pool. All sites feature water, sewer, and electric hookups (both 30 and 50 amp), as well as free Wi-Fi; self-serve laundry is also available. If you’re traveling with a boat, rest assured as the Grassy Key RV Park & Resort has a newly renovated dock so people can cruise crystal clear waters.

Link to Park website

Best RV Parks in California

The last few RV parks on our list are located in the Golden State of California and come with a plethora of nearby activities and amenities. California is well-known for its unique culture, breathtaking views, and diverse settings. It’s almost as if this magical state was made for travelers and those living the RV lifestyle. Let’s take a look at the top parks and what makes them stand apart.

Sonoma Coast State Park

Sonoma Coast State Park
Image Credit: Nikita / flickr

The first Californian destination is Sonoma Coast, State Park. Comprised of several places to camp, all of which offer a variety of access points to the beach, two of the more popular spots are Wright’s Beach and Bodega Dunes.

Although hookups are not available at either, these sites offer one-of-a-kind views and comfortable amenities. The maximum size at Wright’s Beach is 27 feet while the max at Bodega Dunes is 31 feet.

Be sure to keep in mind that Wright’s Beach does not feature portable water-filling areas. Because of this, guests are encouraged to fill their tank up prior to arriving to ensure their stay is hassle-free.

Link to Sonoma Coast State Park

Dockweiler RV Park

Dockweiler RV Park
Image Credit: Dockweiler RV Park

Located in Playa del Rey, Dockweiler RV park allows guests to visit the Californian coast and enjoy views that range from Malibu to Catalina. Sites offer full hookups, picnic tables, and grills, while the park itself features a pump-out station for sewer, washers, dryers, and showers.

When the time comes to have fun, Dockweiler guests can play at one of the nearby volleyball courts or grab their surfboard and hang ten. Be sure to bring your wetsuit as non-summer seasons can bring brisk waters.

The maximum size of RV permitted per site is 40 feet and we should note that there’s no tent camping allowed. One of the best features to this park is that visitors can have fires on the beach (weather conditions permitting). Nothing better than some smores after the sun goes down.

Link to Dockweiler RV Park website

Chula Vista RV Resort

Chula Vista RV ResortImage Clip Credit: Dustin Horning / Youtube

Located in San Diego, Chula Vista RV Resort is a mint destination with ample amenities and nearby attractions. Some of the popular attractions located on-site are the pool and hot tub, workout room, tiki bar, which is complemented by a fire pit, and a delicious restaurant named Galley at the marina.

Additionally, the location makes it an ideal pick for families, being that Chula Vista is near the San Diego Zoo and SeaWorld. With this, Legoland, Universal Studios, and Disneyland are less than 2 hours away.

When it comes to setting up your RV, they offer 237 concrete sites with full hookups and privacy from nearby campers. Chula Vista features a variety of spaces to accommodate your lifestyle and travel needs. The various sizes are as listed below:

  • Super Saver – Average Size: 20 X 50
  • Interior – Average Size: 20 X 50
  • Deluxe Interior – Average Size: 20 X 50
  • Bayside Sites – Average Size: 20 X 50
  • Pull-Through Sites – Average Size: 20 X 60
  • Marina Pull Thrus – Average Size: 20 x 60
  • Premium Sites – Average Size: 20 X 50
  • Premium Pull-Thru- Average Size: 20×60

Be sure to visit their website for information regarding availability and detailed site information.

Link to Chula Vista Facebook Page

Malibu Beach RV Park

Malibu Beach RV Park
Image Credit: Malibu Beach RV Park

We couldn’t make a list of the best RV parks on the beach without mentioning one in Malibu. Malibu Beach RV Park is located along the Pacific Coast Highway and is a perfect spot to set up and relax. Whether you’re passing through or making it your destination, this park is plush. They offer propane services, limited Wi-Fi access, laundry services, and bathrooms with heated showers.

If you’re with a group who enjoys beach activities or you personally enjoy them, Malibu Beach is a top pick for body surfing, fishing, and swimming. Additionally, guests are encouraged to bask in the views as they may get the opportunity to see some beautiful wildlife. Whale watching is best during March, April, October, and November. You can also see dolphins year round! For more information regarding rates and hookup amenities, visit the Malibu Beach website.

Link to Malibu Beach RV Park website

Bodega Bay RV Park

Bodega Bay RV Park
Image Credit: MARELBU, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The last great destination in California is Bodega Bay, RV Park. Since the park’s inception in 1967, visitors have been rallying to partake in breathtaking views, scenic landscapes, and diverse outdoor activities. With 78 sites available, 58 offer full hookups, and a majority feature partial. The maximum RV length permitted is 60 feet and just under half of the sites are pull-through.

Nearby, there are a variety of trails to hike on, as well as a dog park, and a mini putting green. For those who travel and work, there is free Wi-Fi and laundry services on site. Bodega Bay is the perfect spot for families and folks who are retired and live a life on the road.

Conclusion

Whether you’re an avid RV-er or are looking for a weekend excursion, finding a park to suit your needs is essential. It will make your experience much more memorable and ensure your stay is headache free.

We hope this review of the best RV parks on the beach has helped highlight some of the top parks in Texas, Florida, and California. If you’ve stayed at one of the parks included on our list, be sure to drop a comment below and let us know about your experience. We’d love to hear from you about your stay!

Featured Image Credit: MemoryCatcher / Pixabay